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Occupy London 2011
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Menwith Hill Oct 16 2011

Toft Quarry and Sculpture Park, Portland, Dorset

Hinckley Point Nuclear Power Protest Oct 2011: Blockade at the Power Station

Hinckley Point Nuclear Power Protest Oct 2011: Bridgwater March & Rally

Hinckley Point Nuclear Power Protest Oct 2011: Nether Stowey Camp

DSEi Arms Dealers Dinner Bike Ride and Protest

The wonderful brilliant Garden Community Cafe, Cundy Road, London Docklands

DSEi Bike Ride to Arms Fair at Excel 2011

DSEi Musical Protest 2011

Pre-DSEi Action against Arms Selling seminar at Royal Bank of Scotland

Moreton Corbet's ruined Elizabethan Mansion

Peace News Summer Camp 2011

Sheffield

Menwith Hill, Independence FROM America Day, July 4th 2011

Earby, A Parish Map in Song, Poems and Illustrations

East Lancs CND at Burnley May Day Festival and Chernobyl vigils 2011

SELRAP Trackbed walks, April 9th 2011

SELRAP Convention, Skipton, April 8th 2011

London March Against Cuts March 26th 2011

Cycle Tour of the South 2011

Glyn Abbey revisited 2011

Mothers March, London March 12th 2011 & Parliament Square Peace Camp

Manchester March and Rally Against Cuts,
5th February 2011


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more photos from my Scottish cycle tour

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Around Durness... and the John Lennon Garden

The Invisibles at Menwith Hill, Oct 2010

Thurso, the Flow Country and Tongue

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Sleeperzzz Independent Hostel, Rogart, Sutherland

Independence FROM America Day, Menwith Hill, July 4th 2010

The Highland Clearances

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Aldermaston Big Blockade Feb 15th 2010

My Education ...and some other ideas on the topic

Shut Down Heckler & Koch Demo Nottingham Jan 18th 2009

SELRAP Funding Conference, Skipton Nov 2009

East Lancs CND Troops Out demo, Accrington Oct 2009

Target Brimar Demo, Manchester, Oct 2009

Menwith Keep Space for Peace, Oct 2009

DSEi Protests 2009: Arms Dealers Dinner Party and some photos from inside DSEi

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Camp Ashraf Protest at the Foreign Office

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The wettest place in England

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Dancin' to the Stones

Independence FROM America Day, Menwith Hill, July 4th 2009

Todmorden

G20 Docklands Demo April 2nd 2009

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Wemyss Bay Railway Station, architectural gem

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Missing Link III Skipton to Colne Special Train

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Reading Adventure Playground c.1968-69

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Jos

Autograph book 1912->

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President Aristide on Haiti and its future
Posted by: Roy on Sunday, February 20, 2011 - 08:28 PM
Protest Jean-Bertrand Aristide has finally been given a diplomatic passport to return to Haiti!!!.
Global Womens Strike were able to facilitate a commission by the Guardian newspaper for President Aristide to write the following article. See also Mark Weisbrot historical background piece below.
For more information: www.globalwomenstrike.net www.haitisolidarity.net

Jean-Bertrand Aristide
On my return to Haiti …
A profit-driven recovery plan, devised and carried out by outsiders, cannot reconstruct my country
guardian.co.uk Friday 4 February 2011

Haiti's devastating earthquake in January last year destroyed up to 5,000 schools and 80% of the country's already weak university infrastructure. The primary school in Port-au-Prince that I attended as a small boy collapsed with more than 200 students inside. The weight of the state nursing school killed 150 future nurses. The state medical school was levelled. The exact number of students, teachers, professors, librarians, researchers, academics and administrators lost during those 65 seconds that irrevocably changed Haiti will never be known. But what we do know is that it cannot end there.

The exceptional resilience demonstrated by the Haitian people during and after the deadly earthquake reflects the intelligence and determination of parents, especially mothers, to keep their children alive and to give them a better future, and the eagerness of youth to learn – all this despite economic challenges, social barriers, political crisis, and psychological trauma. Even though their basic needs have increased exponentially, their readiness to learn is manifest. This natural thirst for education is the foundation for a successful learning process: what is freely learned is best learned.
Of course, learning is strengthened and solidified when it occurs in a safe, secure and normal environment. Hence our responsibility to promote social cohesion, democratic growth, sustainable development, self-determination; in short, the goals set forth for this new millennium. All of which represent steps towards a return to a better environment.
Education has been a top priority since the first Lavalas government – of which I was president – was sworn into office under Haiti's amended democratic constitution on 7 February 1991 (and removed a few months later). More schools were built in the 10 years between 1994, when democracy was restored, and 2004 – when Haiti's democracy was once again violated – than between 1804 to 1994: one hundred and ninety-five new primary schools and 104 new public high schools constructed and/or refurbished.
The 12 January earthquake largely spared the Foundation for Democracy I founded in 1996. Immediately following the quake, thousands accustomed to finding a democratic space to meet, debate and receive services, came seeking shelter and help. Haitian doctors who began their training at the foundation's medical school rallied to organised clinics at the foundation and at tent camps across the capital. They continue to contribute tirelessly to the treatment of fellow Haitians who have been infected by cholera. Their presence is a pledge to reverse the dire ratio of one doctor for every 11,000 Haitians.
Youths, who through the years have participated in the foundation's multiple literacy programmes, volunteered to operate mobile schools in these same tent camps. In partnership with a group from the University of Michigan in the US, post-traumatic counselling sessions were organised and university students trained to help themselves and to help fellow Haitians begin the long journey to healing. A year on, young people and students look to the foundation's university to return to its educational vocation and help fill the gaping national hole left on the day the earth shook in Haiti.
Will the deepening destabilising political crisis in Haiti prevent students achieving academic success? I suppose most students, educators and parents are exhausted by the complexity of such a dramatic and painful crisis. But I am certain nothing can extinguish their collective thirst for education.
The renowned American poet and essayist, Ralph Waldo Emerson, wrote that "we learn geology the morning after the earthquake". What we have learned in one long year of mourning after Haiti's earthquake is that an exogenous plan of reconstruction – one that is profit-driven, exclusionary, conceived of and implemented by non-Haitians – cannot reconstruct Haiti. It is the solemn obligation of all Haitians to join in the reconstruction and to have a voice in the direction of the nation.

As I have not ceased to say since 29 February 2004, from exile in Central Africa, Jamaica and now South Africa, I will return to Haiti to the field I know best and love: education. We can only agree with the words of the great Nelson Mandela, that indeed education is a powerful weapon for changing the world.

This time, the people of Haiti may win
The US has overthrown Jean-Bertrand Aristide twice. But now it will encounter a new reality in the Americas

Mark Weisbrot
o guardian.co.uk, Thursday 10 February 2011 21.30 GMT
US marines invaded Haiti in 1915, occupying the country until 1934. US officials rewrote the Haitian constitution, and when the Haitian national assembly refused to ratify it, they dissolved the assembly. They then held a "referendum" in which about 5% of the electorate voted and approved the new constitution – which conveniently changed Haitian law to allow foreigners to own land – with 99.9% voting for approval.

The situation today is remarkably similar. The country is occupied, and although the troops wear blue helmets, everyone knows that Washington calls the shots. On 28 November an election was held in which the country's most popular political party was excluded; but still the results of the first round of the election were not quite right. The Organisation of American States (OAS) – under direction from Washington – then changed the results to eliminate the government's candidate from the second round. To force the government to accept the OAS rewrite of the results, Haiti was threatened with a cut-off of aid flows – and, according to multiple sources, President Renι Prιval was threatened with being forcibly flown out of the country, as happened to President Jean-Bertrand Aristide in 2004.

This week Aristide has been issued a diplomatic passport by the government, and is preparing to return from exile in South Africa. But Washington does not agree, as US State Department spokesman PJ Crowley made clear. He was also asked if his government had pressured either the Haitian or South African governments to prevent Aristide's return. He refused to answer: I take that as a "yes".

The US has been the prime cause of instability in Haiti, not only over the last two centuries, but the last two decades. Although Haiti is a small and poor country, Washington still cares very much about who is running it – and as leaked WikiLeaks cables recently demonstrated, they want a government that is in line with their foreign policy for the region.
In 1991, Aristide – Haiti's first democratically elected president – was overthrown after just seven months in office. The officers who carried out the coup and established the military government, killing thousands of innocent Haitians, were subsequently revealed to be in the pay of the US Central Intelligence Agency.

When Aristide was elected to a second term, in 2000, the US and its allies destroyed the economy through an economic aid boycott. Together with aid to the Haitian opposition and an armed insurrection, Washington's effort succeeded in overthrowing the government four years later.

Now that Aristide is returning, we can expect to see another massive smear campaign against him in the local media, with allegations of human rights abuses and comparisons with the Duvalier dictatorships. In his book, Damning the Flood, Professor Peter Hallward looks at the best available data for the number of political murders in Haiti: Duvalier dictatorships (1957-1986), 50,000; after the US-sponsored coup of 1991 (with US-funded death squads), 4,000; after the US-organised coup of 2004, 3,000; Aristide's tenure in office (2001-2004), between 10 and 30.

Aristide cut the political violence in Haiti by abolishing the army and the murderous "section chief" system, which were its main sources. For that, Washington will not forgive him. Can the US and its allies continue to deny Haiti's national sovereignty, which it won 207 years ago in the world's first successful slave revolt? Aristide is still a symbol of that sovereignty, and respect for the millions of poor Haitians. For Washington, that is inherently dangerous.

But the Americas have changed since the last time Aristide was overthrown. Washington met strong resistance from South America when it supported the coup government in Honduras in 2009; Honduras has still not been allowed back into the OAS. Governments that Washington does not want – for example in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Venezuela – have been elected and survived despite coup attempts and other destabilisation efforts. The left-of-centre governments that now preside over most of Latin America have dramatically and permanently changed hemispheric relations.

Last week Washington failed to gain support for its change of Haiti's election results in the 23-nation Rio Group. Rights can no longer be denied to Haitians, simply because they are poor and black. Nor can Aristide be denied the right to return to his country. As with Egypt, Washington will have to adapt to a new reality.

For more information: www.globalwomenstrike.net www.haitisolidarity.net

 
Regular Peace Actions 

Permanent, Faslane,6 miles NW of Helensburgh, Scotland on A814:
Faslane Peace Camp sited close to Faslane Nuclear Submarine Base. Also 1st Saturday in every month noise demo, workshops, free cafe and kids space. Tel:01436 820901 For photos click here

Permanent for 'woodland maintenance workers', near Garelochhead, Scotland: Peaton Glen Wood Peace Camp sited opposite Coulport Nuclear Weapons Base For more info click here

Every Tuesday evening, 6 - 8 pm, Main Entrance at NSA/USAF Menwith Hill, near Harrogate, North Yorkshire: Peaceful protests/witnesses against the proposed US 'Star Wars' systemThe demonstration is focussed on the people who work at USAF Menwith Hill - for example - we are protesting at the roles this base has ie in the American Missile Defense System ("Star Wars"), the specifically the continuing role re the Afghanistan and Iraq conflict, the policy of 'pre-emptive strikes', the ECHELON system We are also calling for Independence FROM America. Please come and voice your concerns at the presence of this American base on UK land.For more info click here


For more info click here


2nd weekend of every month: Aldermaston Women's Peace Camp clickhere
or contact info@aldermaston.net

Every Wednesday, 4-6pm Brighton, Smash EDO,noise demo against the arms manufacturer for more information click here


3rd weekend of every month, North Yorkshire: Menwith Hill Women's Peace Camp contact helenmenwith@yahoo.co.uk

last weekend of every month, Cumbria: Sellafield Women's Peace Camp contact 0113 262 1534


First Mondays of every month 5-6pm Warton, on A584 7 miles west of Preston, Lancashire. Vigil and leafletting of workers at arms makers BAE Systems site contact Jan Harper 0151 2636578 janharper1@yahoo.co.uk  

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